Michael's Dispatches

Torture: Some Global Implications

12 Comments

29 March 2009

The following story represents just one of the great crevasses opened by torture.  This is serious business.  Some previously high-placed American officials could be forced to restrict international travel, or face arrest and imprisonment in foreign jails:

Spanish Court Weighs Inquiry on Torture for 6 Bush-Era Officials

By MARLISE SIMONS

LONDON — A Spanish court has taken the first steps toward opening a criminal investigation into allegations that six former high-level Bush administration officials violated international law by providing the legal framework to justify the torture of prisoners atGuantánamo Bay, Cuba, an official close to the case said.


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  • This commment is unpublished.
    Gregory Wonderwheel · 10 years ago
    I'm not sure what message this post is expecting to convey. Are you saying that the dishonorable lying madmen who authorized torture and created the war on false gournds should not be prosecuted?

    I congratulate Spain and any other nation that would prosecute the madmen in the US White House who authorized torture for being the war criminals that they are. It is only a shame that prosecutors in the USA are so dishonorable and hypocritical that they won't exercise the same war crimes tribunal against our leaders that were exercised against the German leaders after WWII. It just goes to show that the victors write the history and those same dishonorable people are still in control of USA government even though the names of the players has changed.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Douglas Loss · 10 years ago
    Mr. Wonderwheel, your far-left delusions are showing full force. There can be (and is) serious discussion and disagreement on what constitutes torture. And if a foreign court decides it can prosecute any person in the world for actions taken outside it's jurisdiction, you can just throw the whole concept of international law out the window. You, sir, are not thinking straight (or evidently, at all) about the issues at hand.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Paul S. · 10 years ago
    I wonder how many Spaniards have been to Gitmo to see how prisoners and their guards live.

    moveamericaforward.org's contingent has.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Cecil Trotter · 10 years ago
    I have to wonder if Spain has any restrictions on Hamas, Hezbollah and/or Iranian officials traveling to Spain?

    If I were to guess I'd say that the answer is no and that Hamas, Hezbollah and Iranian officials, who've been instrumental in KILLING thousands, are not subject to a threat of arrest were they to travel to Spain.

    Just more, typical, leftist hypocrisy.

    And it is also becoming typical for Yon to latch on to such stories as somehow being proof of how evil the Bush administration was.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    dfp21 · 10 years ago
    ...threatened prosecution against Henry Kissinger and Donald Rumsfeld as I recall. This is a never-ending series of liberal mental masturbation.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    13times · 10 years ago
    The complaint was prepared by Spanish lawyers, with help from experts in the United States and Europe, and filed by a Spanish human rights group, the Association for the Dignity of Prisoners.

    Google and Wiki search results show no official website for "Association for the Dignity of Prisoners."

    AftDoP has no official spokesperson or the writer for the NYT's decilined to interview them.

    Who founded AfdDoP? How are they funded?

    Investigative journalism at its finest! Well done Mr Yon.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Bellerophon · 10 years ago
    First, we must know who is bringing this case to court: Gonzalo Boye. Who is he? I saw on the Oreilly factor that he has spent the better part of a decade in prison for his association with the ETA and his part in the kidnapping of Spanish businessman Emiliano Revilla. The only link I can provide on this is here, nobody else seems interested in this little bit of info.
    http://angelpolitics.wordpress.com/2009/01/30/gonzalo-boye-behind-lawsuit-against-benjamin-ben-eliezer/

    Secondly, the people named in the court case are those that gave advice to the President about what did or did not constitute torture (AG Gonzales, John C. Yoo, etc...). These people did not make policy on whether the U.S. should torture. They did not participate in torturing someone. These men gave their advice to the President when asked what his options were. If they can be jailed for voicing opinion, then what is to stop the rest of us from being jailed?
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Charles Doval · 10 years ago
    Today Andrew C. McCarthy illuminates the story at National Review Online in his article Spainƒ??s ƒ??Universal Jurisdictionƒ?? Power Play.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Mark C. · 10 years ago
    We need to put these people and their actions under the microscope and evaluate their actions in a court of law. They are most likely guilty of heinous war crimes and if that is indeed found to be the case they must be punished.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Jesse · 10 years ago
    I'm glad to see that this topic is finally catching on in the US. For too long the Bush Administration conducted shady interrogations and then tried to hide it. I understand the need for intelligence, and the good that it does, but I cannot support devaluing human dignity to that point.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Jesse · 10 years ago
    I'm glad to see that this topic is finally catching on in the US. For too long the Bush Administration conducted shady interrogations and then tried to hide it. I understand the need for intelligence, and the good that it does, but I cannot support devaluing human dignity to that point.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Jesse · 10 years ago
    I think it is interesting that this Spanish court is investigating and prosecuting this case. As a highly leftist organization, what credibility does this case have when Spain is known to allow Hamas terrorists and the like into their borders, but now they are looking down their nose at government officials accused of allowing torture? Granted, torture is no joke, but this seems like more typical leftist nonsense.
    I'm glad to see that this topic is finally catching on in the US. For too long the Bush Administration conducted shady interrogations and then tried to hide it. I understand the need for intelligence, and the good that it does, but I cannot support devaluing human dignity to that point, I just think is a matter that should be handled internally, and with Condi Rice and Cheney making headlines for signing off on waterboarding, it looks like it is being taken care of.

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